Archive: film policy

Re/Defining Film Education (13th April 2012 Event)

MEA attended the seminar convened by Film Education [1] and the BFI on 13th April 2012, entitled ‘Re/defining Film Education’. The seminar brought together over fifty scholars, practitioners, film-makers, advocates and teachers of film to debate the outcomes of the 21st Century Literacy strategy findings http://www.21stcenturyliteracy.org.uk/docs/Advocacy-Report.pdf  and to consider the ways forward for film education. The seminar asked:

  • Is there a coherent understanding of what film education is supposed to achieve?
  • Does Film Education address specific knowledge and understanding or is it exclusively about creativity? Or a combination of these? If so, how can an integrated film education be achieved?
  • Are the aims of film education the same for children (and people) of all ages, in all settings, or should it be inflected by different contexts?
  • How can we get closer to agreeing on what is actually meant by film education?

The seminar commenced with a series of ‘thought pieces’ that demonstrated the breadth and range of film education in all its contexts. Terry Bolas [2] kick-started the conference with the view from history, concluding that progress had been made and yet reminding us that some of the debates we are still engaged in as teachers are ongoing, such as convincing policy makers of the worth and value of film education and working from a systematic strategy for learning with and through film education. (more…)

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A Future for British Film…

This link to the report on the Film Policy Review Survey is a useful starting point for considering what is going to happen to film education in the UK.

“…it begins with the audience”

 

http://www.culture.gov.uk/publications/8743.aspx

In a digital age, the ability both to learn about film and to learn from film (in schools, in universities and colleges, or in lifelong learning) could be greatly enhanced. But existing interventions around learning, especially for children and young people, lack cohesion, while engagement with higher education appears ad hoc. To help address this, the Review recommends that a new single offer for education is co-ordinated by the BFI, alongside a far more strategic engagement with Higher and Further Education and lifelong learning.

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