Archive: children

Submission to BFI Consultation

Our aim is to ensure everyone, particularly young people, wherever they live, can learn about and enjoy the widest range of film. Our aspiration is that film is part of the education of every young person in the UK.

The MEA is happy to endorse this general aim. We feel these aspirations are particularly significant for the formal education sector, and will require a unified and consistent commitment to curriculum development and research. (more…)

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New Ofcom Report

Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes

The report is designed to give an accessible overview of media use, attitudes and understanding among children and young people aged 5-15. It also documents the views of parents/carers about their child’s media use, and the rules, tools and other ways that parents manage such use. The full Report can be read here.

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Ofcom: Media Literacy Report

Ofcom today published reports looking into the media literacy of adults and children in Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales.
This follows the publication of the UK media literacy reports earlier this year.

The reports investigate media use and attitudes among children aged 5-15 and their parents/carers, and adults aged 16+, across the UK.

 

The reports can be found here: http://www.ofcom.org.uk/medialiteracyresearch.

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New Research on Children’s Learning

How do children learn about films, social media, games and comics? Here’s some new research together with some fascinating examples of children’s work.

The UK Literacy Association, the Centre for Literacy in Primary Education and the BFI have jointly published a booklet together with online resources about learning progression in film and other non-print texts. It’s called Beyond Words, is edited by Eve Bearne with Cary Bazalgette, and is available for £5 from UKLA here.

The material on the linked microsite at www.readingfilm.co.uk (password available in the booklet) comes from a UKLA/CLPE/BFI research project led by Professor Jackie Marsh of Sheffield University.

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